Step 80: Respond to Teaching Evaluations 1

Note: I’m addressing this to students, and this post is… condescending and patronizing. You have been warned.

As a whole, academics are self-centered. I don’t mean that they are egotistical – although some certainly are – but that they have an internal locus of control as well as a high self-efficacy. Academics tend to believe that they are competent and capable of doing their job. This is not to say that they are not open and sensitive to critique, but that academics tend to be critical of the criticisms themselves, and groundless criticisms mostly flow off our backs. After all, we went through a PhD program, and a lot of that was being told that our work was insufficient.

(That was a paragraph of sweeping generalizations; I apologize.)

Which is to say that if you despise a faculty and you want to tank their teaching evaluations, YouTube comment tactics are not going to work. First, giving someone across-the-board zeroes is easily detected. This is called an outlier in statistics, and is often excluded for summarization. Similarly, comments such as “Justin is a terrible person” do not mean much to me. It’s kind of like being called “stupid” by a young kid – the default response is “yeah, okay, I have better things to worry about”. For the comment about me being a terrible person, it’s not even that I disagree with the comments – me writing this blog post is terrible and passive aggressive of me.

So, students, here’s a tip. The way to make your negative evaluation count is to point out where the instructor is incompetent then (and this is key) back it up with evidence. Stop with the personal attacks (“Justin is a terrible person.”) and talk about what they did not do (“Justin is a terrible teacher.”). Personally, comments that I am condescending cause me less stress than arguments that my classes were not thought out. An evaluation that says “Justin’s classes are disorganized” is good, one that says “he jumped from one topic to the next” is better. Show that you know what the instructor was trying to do and that they failed. Talk about how the instructor negatively affected your ability to meet the goals of the course (maybe “Every class presented a random collection of facts, and there was no attempt to give the big picture.”) or better yet, that the instructor reflects negatively on the department/field (eg. “Although I was really interested in the class at first, I have decided that I will not major in this department if I have to continue taking classes with Justin.”). Finally, if you want to be just plain mean, compare them to other professors.

This is not guaranteed to work, especially as professors gain experience and have seen the gamut of comments. But you would have achieved your goal of rattling the instructor. Why am I telling you this? Because the most effective criticism are also the ones that help faculty figure out what to change. You are telling us what doesn’t work, and where we might do better. Speaking for myself, the more biting your criticism – as long as I see it as valid – the more I’m motivated to improve and change it. So if you’re disgruntled, by all means, negatively evaluate us – but doing it well.

Most of the quotes so far were made up, but I do want to give a real teaching evaluation comment that hit me hard. This was a mid-semester comment from two years ago:

Justin, honestly, has been terrible so far. His method of teaching is simply not conducive to learning. For example, the class features i-clicker questions, which from my experience have helped me test whether I’m understanding the material. However, Justin usually gives out an increasingly difficult series of questions regarding a topic and then proceeds to teaching the topic, generally making what could be considered mocking remarks when people get it wrong and effectively negating the purpose of i-clickers by testing us on material that we don’t cover until after the questions. Furthermore, when giving out answers for i-clickers, he generally makes remarks like “I think it’s this one” or “pretty sure, it’s C,” as if he is unaware of the correct answers for a class he’s teaching (i.e. unprepared for class). Finally, a TA led lecture when Justin was unable to attend, and it was by far the clearest, most helpful lecture I’ve experienced in the course. And from interacting with nearby students after the TA’s lecture, my sentiment seems to be shared.

Overall, I’m taking this class as a senior for general interest, so Justin’s inadequacy as a lecturer is frustrating but not inhibiting. However, for the freshmen/sophomore in the class who are considering an EECS major, I feel that the EECS department has done those students a massive disservice by allowing Justin to teach. I can’t imagine how uninspired I would be if I came across an unprepared, rude, unhelpful lecturer like him when doing the pre-reqs for my current major, and I sincerely hope he doesn’t deter some of the smart, engaging students around me who are considering an EECS major. Besides the problems/suggestions highlighted above, my final suggestion would be to allow another professor (or honestly, even the aforementioned TA) to teach the remaining lectures. Otherwise, the EECS department can go on knowing that they wasted two hours and forty minutes of interested, devoted students’ time per week because of Justin’s poor performance as an instructor.

After I first read this comment, I could not focus on my work for a week. I seriously questioned my ability and my desire to continue teaching. Part of it was because it was the first wholly negative teaching evaluation I have received. I still wince when I reread those two paragraphs, but I’m not sure I would break down quite as badly if I get the same evaluation now – I’ve just come to accept that I can’t please everyone.

(PS. Although the comment was provided anonymously, I have reason to believe that the same student ended the semester with a positive evaluation of me. The corresponding paragraph is one of all all-time favorite comments of my teaching.)

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Step 80: Respond to Teaching Evaluations 1

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